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Georg Philipp Telemann:
The "Gigue" is Up!


"Gigue" is the French word for jig -- a lively dance in triple time. The jig started out as folk dance in Ireland, Scotland, and northern England, before finding its way into classical music.

Music heard in this episode:
Traditional: Irish Washerwoman
Playford: The Queen's Jigg
Richard Reade: A Jigge Ye First
Lully: Gigue
Handel: Gigue
Bach: Cello Suite #1
Holst: St. Paul's Suite
Debussy: Images: Gigues
Pachelbel: Canon and Gigue
Telemann: Gigue from Suite in D
Traditional: Irish Washerwoman
Playford: The Queen's Jigg
Richard Reade: A Jigge Ye First
Lully: Gigue
Handel: Gigue
Bach: Cello Suite #1
Holst: St. Paul's Suite
Debussy: Images: Gigues
Pachelbel: Canon and Gigue
Telemann: Gigue from Suite in D

Other shows about Georg Philipp Telemann:
About Georg Philipp Telemann
Go for Baroque
Self-Taught Composers

Download this month's activity sheet



About Georg Philipp Telemann
3/14/1681 - 6/25/1767
Born in Germany

Georg Philipp Telemann was born in Magdeburg, Germany. He came from a long line of ministers, so everyone expected him to become one, too. But as a kid, he learned to play several musical instruments, and taught himself to compose.

When Telemann went to the university in Leipzig, he was supposed to study law and forget about music. But his music-loving roommate found out that Telemann was a composer, and arranged to have one of his pieces performed. The next thing Telemann knew, he was writing music for the biggest church in town.

For a while, Telemann was a court composer, but eventually he got tired of working for counts and dukes. So he became a municipal music director -- first for the city of Frankfurt, and then for Hamburg, a very important German port.

Unlike many composers, Telemann was famous and appreciated in his day. He was friends with most of his fellow composers, and was godfather to one of Johann Sebastian Bach's sons: Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach has his middle name!

See other composers born in Germany

 

This Week's Quiz:

1. A jig is a lively dance that came from the British Isles.

True

False


2.Composers in the Baroque era wrote jigs that were meant for listening rather than dancing.

True

False


3. In Shakespeare's day, the word JIG meant a song that poked fun at something.

True

False



 

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